Vegan Mofo 20: Roundup

So Vegan Mofo is over and it’s October already but better a late reflection than never. I must say I literally cooked my way through the alphabet. For simplicity, I’ll do my reflection Q&A style.

Why I joined Vegan Mofo
1. I was unemployed and had too much time on hand; 2. To connect with other blogs; 3. To gain publicity; 4. To expand my repertoire of vegan recipes.

On my theme

The A-Z theme is flexible yet guided so you won’t run out of recipes or things to blog about. While sometimes I had to buy a specific ingredient just for the recipe, it afforded the opportunity to work with with ingredients I never had before, such as jicama, red beans, and yams. In writing about the dishes, I also learnt a lot about the history such as how Thunder Tea Rice came about. In short, the A-Z theme is useful for the unseasoned cook.

Did Vegan Mofo meet my expectations?
Seriously, I was too busy with maintaining my own blog that I hardly had time to visit other blogs. There wasn’t any significant increase in readership (posts not interesting enough?) but I’m not too worked up over that. What’s more important is that I’m now more confident of vegan cooking, such as how to use vegan eggs, coconut whipped cream, sprouting etc. Also in the past I used to make mostly single-serving dishes but now I am more confident working with mass ingredients.

Would I join Vegan Mofo again?
Seeing that the requirement is to churn out at least 20 posts in a month, it means cooking yourself silly and blogging at a maniacal speed. It was truly fun, it pushed the borders of my creativity, but it was really time-consuming. Sure you could fall short of the 20 posts (I doubt the organizers would do anything), but I’m not one to renegade on my word. I would join Vegan Mofo next year again only if I have the time, and choose a different theme that doesn’t require so much cooking.

My favorite recipes
Below is a gallery of all the dishes created for Vegan Mofo (you can click on the individual pictures to go to the post). The hits are the Sprouted Granola, Durian Mousse Cake , Thai Quinoa Salad with Jicama and the Lentil Sunday Roast. The Chocolate Maple Pecan Butter is so good too! Disasters include the vegan cheese block and the Kuih Ondeh Ondeh.

 

What’s in store for Early Morning Oats?
First I’m looking to move to having my own domain and redesigning the site. I’m also looking to expand this blog beyond a recipe website, perhaps writing on health & fitness and nutrition, as well as have a “photography” tab as I want to develop my photography repertoire to just beyond food. In terms of recipes, this month I’m looking forward to expand my raw recipes because I really feel the difference and increase in appetite my eating more veggies.

So this sums up my reflection of Vegan Mofo. After this intense period of cooking myself silly, I’m looking forward to days of normalcy.

Vegan Mofo 17: S is for Sesame Tofu (Goma Dofu)

Think tofu has to be made from soy? When I first came across this Japanese dish called Goma Dofu or sesame tofu, I thought it was an ingenious idea – a soy-free tofu made from sesame paste!

Tofu, in the traditional sense, is made by coagulating proteins in soy milk. Common coagulants used are magnesium chloride (nigari), calcium chloride or calcium sulphate (gypsum). (The divalent cations of these salts react with the anionic groups of the soy proteins, which destabilizes their structure and cause coagulation.) However since sesame does not contain as high levels of protein as soy, Goma Dofu is solidified using a starch, typically kuzu or kudzu starch, although arrowroot or potato starch may also be used. On the differences between the different starches, kuzu starch, which is extracted from the root of the kuzu plant, imparts a more elastic texture than arrowroot or potato starch.

I bought the Goma Dofu from a Japanese supermarket although it can be easily made from just three ingredients – sesame paste (white or black), kuzu starch and water. My first thought? Bleah, just pass me real tahini instead! It was starchier than expected but less so than tapioca balls, slightly gelatinous and wobbly, and its consistency was firmer than silken tofu not quite as firm as an agar jelly. It had a mild hint of sesame just enough to be noticed, but left you craving more, and being the ardent tahini addict, I proceeded to smother the goma dofu in a coat of tahini. Much better!

Typically, Goma Dofu is served as an appetizer or as a course in kaiseki dining. It was probably invented by Japanese Buddhist monks and is considered the most symbolic food of Shojin Ryori (vegetarian temple cuisine). Apart from excluding meat and fish, one website even says that root vegetables are excluded! It is believed that harvesting will cause the death of the vegetables, which is against their principle philosophy of “don’t kill.” As such, only grains, beans, nuts, seeds, vegetables and fruits are used. An in-depth article on Shojin Ryori can be found here.

So overall, I didn’t quite take to Sesame Tofu, although some has gone so far as to describe it as giving melt-in-your mouth experience. Sesame Tofu is not only the faux tofu; this can also be made with ground peanuts (peanut tofu), or also check out Shan tofu, a Burmese staple made from chickpea flour.

Vegan Mofo 13: P is for chocolate maple Pecan butter

Another vegan version of nutella, made with the flavours of fall.

Hazelnuts are a tough find in Singapore, but with an irresistible urge for Nutella, I thought pecans make the best surrogate. To go with the fall season, I decided a touch of maple flavour would be lovely. What makes this nut butter extra special personally is that it is the first batch of nut butter to be churned out of my new food processor!

Pecans conjure up thoughts of decadent treats like pies, pralines and candies, but there’s no reason to shy away from these tasty nuts. It is in fact the nut with the most antioxidants! This is measured according to a method called Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) – a fluorescence-based assay for reactive oxygen species. Pecans are also high in other nutrients and minerals including vitamin A, vitamin E, folic acid, calcium and magnesium. But alas every good thing has a dark side; it is also the nut with the highest (good) fat. So as always, the moral is moderation.

But moderation is hard when it comes to this pecan nutella. You’d want to spoon it on everything, from oatmeals to toast or heck, just eat it straight out from the spoon. Truthfully its texture is more of a soft cookie dough than a drippy nut butter, but that doesn’t stop it from being any less tasty.

The pecan nut is also the state tree of Texas. You’d probably know that if you are American, but I was amazed to find out that each state of the U.S.A has an official tree. Apart from the pecan tree, the sugar maple tree – representing the states of New York, Vermont, West Virginia and Wisconsin, would be another favorite.

Here a date you may want to bookmark too – April 14, which is National Pecan Day celebrated since 1996. I think a more appropriate date should be closer to Thanksgiving, or at least coincide with the fall season? On hindsight, maybe it is better to spread out the dates as an excuse for more pecan parties!

For fellow Singaporeans, you can get really cheap pecans (and other nuts) from Albert Centre Food Complex L3. I can’t really remember the exact price, but it’s way cheaper than buying from the supermarket.

Chocolate Maple Pecan Butter
Makes about 1/2 cup. (You can double or triple the recipe if desired).
Vegan. Raw.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup raw pecans
  • 4 tsp raw cacao powder
  • 1 tsp maple syrup (or more for a stronger maple flavour)
  • Ground cinnamon (optional)

Directions

  1. Place pecans into the food processor and blend. Stop to scrape down the sides with a spatula, as many times as needed. At first the mixture becomes mealy, but then moistens and melts into a velvety smooth and delicious nut butter. It took me about 10 mins.
  2. Then add the cocoa powder and maple syrup and blend again to combine.
  3. Store in an air-tight container and refrigerate.

 


I am in the process of revamping my blog and I thought an FAQ page will be useful. Feel free to ask any questions from food to lifestyle in the comment box or you can email me at sab-06@hotmail. Whatever your questions, I’d be happy to hear.

Vegan Mofo 12: N is for buckwheat Nori rolls

I did not intend on posting about these Nori rolls because they were unphotogenic and falling apart, or simply put, not “blog-worthy.” Then I caught myself; this blog was started first and foremost as a record of my kitchen experiments. Although it’s great to have a readership, it is no longer meaningful when you write for the audience rather than for yourself. At the very least, sharing my mistakes may help others to. And so this post was resurrected.

You probably need no introduction to nori. Apart from being the nickname of Kim Kardashian and Kayne West’s baby, it is the umami paper-like stuff that holds your sushi together. More scientifically, it is red algae fronds (P. yezoensis and P. tenera) harvested from the inter- and sub-tidal ocean zones, then pressed into thin sheets and dried with a machine that resembles a paper-making machine. In addition to being used as sushi wrappers, they can be also be deep-fried or baked and enjoyed as an addictive crispy snack.

But back to basics. As a sushi lover, it only makes sense to learn how to make sushi rolls. Not only can you save money, you can customize the fillings to your hearts content. There are many good videos sushi-rolling tutorials on youtube including this (includes both normal and inside-out rolls), or if you prefer a step-by-step guide you can check this out (note that ingredients used are not vegan).

For the fillings I went with buckwheat, carrot, jicama and tofu. Making sushi rolls is not the time to be greedy; I had too much of the fillings and the rolls wouldn’t stick at the seams. They fell apart completely and eventually I had to turn the sushi rolls into a sushi bowl. Still tasty though!

Using buckwheat in place of sushi rice may or may not be a good idea. It has a natural slime so which helps the groats stick together just like sticky sushi rice. However the groats itself are quite large so which reduces the amount of other fillings that can be put into the sushi. The solution? These rolls made with Sticky Quinoa Rice sounds like the answer.

Meanwhile, these are some fantastic Tofu Rolls I had at New Green Pastures Cafe a few weeks ago. The veggies were lightly cooked so that they retained some crunch, and were accompanied with a very tasty shallot sauce reminiscent of that used in popiahs. I was actually inspired by these rolls hence the similar ingredients used in my version.

New Green Pastures Cafe
Address: #04-22, Fortune Centre, 190 Middle Road, Singapore 188979


I am in the process of revamping my blog and I thought an FAQ page will be useful. Feel free to ask any questions from food to lifestyle in the comment box or you can email me at sab-06@hotmail. Whatever your questions, I’d be happy to hear.

Vegan Mofo 11: M is for Mooncake

Today is the 15th day of the eight month of the lunar calendar, which marks Mid-Autumn Festival. Walking lanterns, donning papier mâché masks and offering foods to the gods are all part of the festivities, but let’s be honest, most of us associate this holiday with the indispensable delicacy called mooncakes.

Traditionally, mooncakes are palm-sized Chinese pastries with an egg yolk center that is embraced by a sweet rich paste made from lotus seed, red bean or jujube and a variety of nuts and seeds. The sweet/salty contrast is what makes mooncakes so irresistibly good. Additionally, crusts can vary from being thin and glossy (Cantonese-style), flaky (Suzhou and Taiwan-style) or chewy (modern snowskin varieties). As far as symbolism goes, its round-shape signifies the completeness and unity of the family while the bright golden yolk represents the full moon and also wealth.

I was surprised to learn a few years ago that lard is commonly used in traditional mooncakes to achieve a smooth texture and impart fragrance. For vegans/vegetarians, snowskin mooncakes are a safer bet because the skin is made from cooked glutinous rice flour and vegetable oil (although you may want to check the ingredients first). Although my family is not big on mooncakes, this year I got to enjoy some heavenly nuggets – either gifted/bought from restaurants or friends, as well as a rather inauthentic version that I invented at a last minute.

Mao Shan Wang Durian Mooncake, Peony Jade

Source

Generous chunks of 100% pure premium bittersweet Mao Shan Wang durian in organic pandan snowskin. I didn’t really care for the skin, which I found too sweet and lacking bite, but the durian… delicious, divine, decadent or heavenly, but truly, no words can do justice to describe it. Just so good! They were swiped clean in a matter of a few days hence the borrowed picture.

Pandan Lotus Paste with Brown Rice Snowskin (left) and Red Bean Paste with Glutinous Rice Snowskin (right) from Chen Xi (@peabrainner on Instagram). Both mooncakes are vegan.

I got to know Chen Xi through Instagram. Her pictures, mainly of food but also of street shots and architecture in Singapore, are colorful and varied and I was drawn to her account immediately. Moreover how often to you “meet” a fellow vegan friend in Singapore? Anyway her mother was having a mooncake sale and just the descriptions of the mooncakes alone was enough to entice me into buying. The skin of snowskin mooncakes are usually made with cooked glutinous rice flour (koh fun/gao fen), so a brown rice snowskin was novel and certainly worth a try.

Both mooncakes impressed with their not too sweet paste. There was none of the cloying oiliness that can sometimes be present in commercial mooncakes, but instead had a clean natural mouthfeel. The texture of the snowskin was the highlight – springy and thick, and infused with a gentle hint of pandan or red bean. Usually I’m a fillings person and abandon the skin (too sweet/doughy), but for the first time I actually found a snowskin that was palatable! The brown rice (pandan) snowskin was also noticeably softer than the glutinous rice (red bean) one – an interesting observation worthy of experimentation. Of the two, I preferred the pandan which came filling came studded with bits of brown rice, imparting the mooncake with a unique texture different from the usual crunchy nuts/seeds.

Matcha Buckwheat Mooncakes with Peanut Butter Sweet Potato Yolk, a creation by earlymorningoats.

Essentially, you may consider this a buckwheat peanut butter cup masquerading as a mooncake. I initially planned on making traditional/snowskin mooncakes, but eventually had to abandon the idea because of the lack of time and resources. Then last night a spark of inspiration hit; why not a buckwheat mooncake?

An ashen brown, the colour of buckwheat flour makes the perfect mimic for lotus paste. The buckwheat bake is made with a banana-flax base and stippled with pumpkin and sunflower seeds for a satisfying crunch. For the yolk, I went with a ball of sweet potato, rolled oats and peanut butter. Not only does it resemble the golden egg yolk/moon, the peanut butter adds a savoury touch similar to the salted duck egg yolk in traditional mooncakes. Finally for the “skin”, I went with a green tea cashew frosting. Green tea is a popular flavour in mooncakes because its bitter notes help balance out the sweet filling. Initially I was afraid that the earthy buckwheat and bitter matcha might be too overwhelming, but the flavours all worked out beautifully in the end.

I had some leftover sweet potato “yolks” which I baked alongside with the mooncake. This might just be the best snack ever.

Matcha Buckwheat Mooncakes with Peanut Butter Sweet Potato Yolk
1 3.5″ mooncake.
Vegan. Gluten-Free.
Buckwheat Bake adapted from Edible Perspective. See Ashley’s blog for a wonderful collection of buckwheat bakes.

Ingredients
For the Sweet Potato Peanut Butter Yolk

  • 1 1/2 tbsp sweet potato puree (preferably from a yellow sweet potato which is starchier than the orange ones)
  • 2 tsp rolled oats
  • 1 tsp natural peanut butter

For the Banana Buckwheat Lotus Paste

  • 5 tbsp buckwheat flour
  • 1 tbsp raw buckwheat groats
  • 2 tsp cacao powder (optional; added for a darker colour)
  • 1-2 tbsp protein powder (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp baking powder
  • 1 flax egg (1 tbsp flax meal + 3 tbsp water)
  • 1/2 medium banana, mashed (about 3-4 tbsp puree)
  • Non-dairy milk, as needed
  • 1 tsp sunflower seeds
  • 1 tsp pumpkin seeds

For the Matcha Cashew Frosting

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350F°/175°C. Lightly oil a 3.5″ mini casserole or ramekin and set aside.
  2. First make the flax egg. In a small bowl, mix the flax meal with water, whisk and let stand for 15 mins to thicken.
  3. Make the sweet potato yolk. Steam a (yellow) sweet potato and mash a few slices to get about 1 1/2 tbsp of puree. Add in the rolled oats and peanut butter, then roll the mix to form a ball about 1.2-inch/3 cm in diameter. Press down gently to flatten slightly. Set aside.
  4. In a medium-size bowl, mix all the dry ingredients for the buckwheat bake. In another bowl, mash the banana then add in the flax egg, which should have thickened. Then create a well in the dry ingredients and fold in the banana-flax mixture. The batter should be thick and sticky. Add non-dairy milk to the batter if necessary. Then, fold in the pumpkin and/or sunflower seeds.
  5. Pour half the batter into the mini-casserole, place the sweet potato yolk in the center, then add the remaining batter around it. Bake the mooncake at 350F°/175°C for 30 mins or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.
  6. Meanwhile as the mooncake is baking, prepare the matcha frosting. Add the matcha powder to the cashew frosting, then refrigerate until needed.
  7. Once the buckwheat mooncake has finished baking, remove from oven and let cool 5 mins then slide a knife around the edge to release. Let cool another 10 mins.
  8. If the top of the buckwheat bake is domed, you may want to slice the top mound off. Then frost with the matcha cashew frosting.

This is probably the only mooncake which you can devour whole and not feel the least bit guilty! And you can enjoy it at any time of the year too!

Vegan Mofo 10: L is for Lentil Sunday Roast

A flavourful roulade packed with meaty mushrooms, toothsome lentils and nutritious spinach. Perfect for Thanksgiving, Christmas or just a normal night’s dinner.

I stumbled upon this savoury roulade recipe by the Mouthwatering Vegan when I was actually searching for a vegan dessert roulade. But what an accidental fortuitous find! It looked absolutely scrumptious that I bookmarked it immediately. Furthermore it gave an opportunity to work with phyllo for the first time. Phyllo has a fussy reputation – a delicate and messy dough that requires tedious buttering and layering. But I’m always up to a challenge and so down to work it was!

But back to lentils (the post should be about lentils after all). Lentils are another favorite pantry staple; they are tasty, cook in a cinch and its uses highly versatile, from bulking up a simple salad to becoming a creamy base for soups and stews. Furthermore, the nutritional value of lentils is well-established. For example did you know that lentils pack the third highest level of protein of all legumes and nuts, trailing after soybeans and hemp only? There’s much to love about lentils!

Lentils come in a myriad of colors including brown, green, yellow, red. The difference between them is the cooking time and texture. Red and yellow lentils cook in about 30 mins and tend to break apart when cooked; hence they are often used in soups, stews and Indian daals or curries. On the other hand, green (or French/Puy) lentils are sturdier and retain their shape when cooked, which make them a better choice for salads. I also find that green lentils have a stronger, more earthy taste than the other varieties, which I adore. In case you were wondering, green lentils are also called Puy after their origin in the Puy region of France.


And for a final lentil tidbit – lentils have been eaten since antiquity and actually appears in the Bible four times (Genesis 25:34; 2 Samuel 17:28 and 23:11; Ezekiel 4:9). The most famous account is in Genesis 25:34, in which Esau exchanged his birthright to Jacob, his younger brother, for a bowl of lentil stew. Either Esau had been truly starving, or that must have been some serious stew!


For the lentil roulade I used green lentils for a more toothsome bite and extra flavour. I’m sure yellow or brown lentils would work too although it may turn out more mushy. Apart from lentils, the filling contains mushrooms and spinach. The trio are seasoned with Middle Eastern spices and reduced to a delicious stewy mix before spreading onto phyllo, then topped with a nutty mix. In fact if you are pressed for time, the filling itself makes a pretty good dish on its own!

The roulade came out fantastic. There were playful textures and flavours for the palate to take pleasure in – a fragile frame of crispy phyllo that shattered into a million delicious pieces upon stabbing with a fork. Then there is the filling – meaty and earthy mushrooms and lentils with the nuttiness of crunchy nuts in between. To balance out the savouriness, I served this with some crisp-steamed broccoli and fresh cherry tomatoes. This is a crowd-pleaser that will warm the hearts of both vegan and non-vegan friends.

Lentil Sunday Roast
Makes one roulade, about 10 1-inch slices.
Vegan.
Adapted from The Mouthwatering Vegan.

Ingredients
Lentil, Spinach & Mushroom Stuffing

  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 red onion, chopped
  • 4 cups mushrooms, chopped into small pieces (I used a mix of portobellos and shiitake)
  • 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 3 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 tsp curry powder
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 250g cooked green puy lentils (can prepared from 125g dry or 1 400g can)
  • 6 oz (170g) spinach, roughly chopped
  • 3 whole sundried tomato, chopped
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • Juice of 1 slice of lemon (about 2 tsp)
  • Zest of half lemon

Nut Topping

  • 3/4 cup nuts, finely chopped (I used a blend of almonds, walnuts and brazil nuts; you can process them in a food processor, but don’t make powder of them, they still need to be in small pieces)

Puff Pastry

  • 5 sheets of vegan phyllo pastry, thawed (I used Fillo Factory Organic Whole Wheat Filo Dough)
  • Non-dairy milk to brush onto pastry

Directions

  1. If using dry lentils, cook the lentils. Place lentils in a saucepan and cover with cold water to cover. Simmer for 25-30 mins until tender. Set aside. If using canned lentils, drain and rinse. Set aside.
  2. In a large skillet, sweat onions in about 1 tbsp of olive oil until they turn soft and translucent, about 10 mins.
  3. Add garlic, mushrooms and 3 tbsp olive oil. Cook until mushrooms release their juices and become soft, stirring often. This will take about 10-15 mins.
  4. Then add in the tomato paste and spices and mix well to combine. Cook on medium-high for about 2 mins until the spices release their aromas.
  5. Finally, add in the cooked lentils and stir, then the spinach and remaining ingredients for the stuffing. Cook on low for about 10-15 mins until the spinach has wilted and the mixture is thick, rich and aromatic. Remove from heat and allow to cool to lukewarm temperature.
  6. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400°F/200°C. Then prepare the pastry sheets. On a floured surface, fold the pastry sheets together in such a way that you create one sheet approximately 10″ x 7″ (25 cm x 18 cm).
  7. Spoon the thick lentil stuffing onto the pastry sheet. Flatten and evenly distribute it using the back of a large spoon, leaving a 1/2″ (1.3 cm) gap all round. Then top with the chopped nuts. Roll along the length to make log. If any bits fall out of the side, just push them back into place.
  8. Brush the roulade with non-dairy milk, then make horizontal cuts at 1-inch (2.5 cm) intervals on the surface of the dough. These will be your markers for each slice once cooked.
  9. Transfer the roulade onto a parchment-lined baking tray and bake at 400°F/200°C for 25-30 mins until golden brown.
  10. As the roulade is baking, you may want to prepare some steamed veggies (eg broccoli or carrots), potatoes or a salad to go with the roulade.
  11. Remove roulade from oven and let cool slightly before slicing (it will be very flaky). Impress your non-vegan friends!

Also, check out this interesting post about how to sprout lentils, and a sprouted lentil vegetable stew.

Vegan Mofo 9: K is for Kuih Ondeh Ondeh

Kuihs are Southeast Asian snacks especially popular in Singapore and Malaysia. It is an umbrella term, encompassing both sweet desserts and savoury bites. Dessert kuihs come in a thousand different shapes, colours, texture and designs, yet they are share a common set of base ingredients: coconut milk, grated coconut, pandan leaves, gula melaka (coconut palm syrup), rice flour, glutinous rice flour, tapioca and/or mung bean flour. The combination of these ingredients is responsible for the kuih’s delightful chewy texture and wonderful fragrance. They are naturally vegan too!

It’s hard to choose, but my favorite kuih has to be Kuih Ondeh Ondeh. These are essentially the Asian equivalent of a molten lava cake; a heavenly pool of melted gula melaka would squirt out as you bite into the chewy sweet potato skin that is infused with the essence of pandan. If anything, coconut + pandan + gula melaka makes the holy trinity of dessert kuihs!

I found several recipes online and it looked pretty easy to make (see links in recipe below). I could not be more wrong. First, I didn’t expect the difficulty in extracting fresh pandan juice from pandan leaves; 1 cup of pandan leaves only yielded a measly tablespoon of the precious green juice! Then I made another mistake by adding too much water when forming the dough. I had to rectify that by adding more glutinous rice flour, which screwed up the proportions of sweet potato-to-flour ratio (ideally it should be about 1:1). Finally, as I molded the balls, some of the gula melaka started melting and oozed out of the pre-boiled balls. The final outcome was, expectedly, disastrous. No oozing filling (it probably all leaked out into the water) and thick doughy skin that ironically, was limp and seemed to tear apart easily too.

From my disastrous experience, here are some pointers you may wish to keep in mind when making ondeh-ondeh:

  • Use pandan essence as a quick solution to pandan juice. Unless you have a lot of time to squeeze the juice from the leaves and are willing clean up the blender.
  • Add water to the dough little by little, until it resembles the texture of play-dough. It should not be sticky.
  • Grate the gula melaka finely so that it melts easily.
  • Use about 10g dough for each ball (I used 15g and it turned out huge as it actually expanded upon boiling.)
  • Some recipes call for tapioca flour in the dough. Not sure how that would affect the texture of the dough.

Although the kuih ondeh-ondeh didn’t turned out well, I’ve learnt quite alot from this disaster and now appreciate the skill needed to make those balls of deliciousness. It’s also my first time working with pandan and glutionous rice flour, so it was quite an experience.

Kuih Ondeh Ondeh (Sweet Potato Glutinous Rice Balls) (Recipe-in-progress)
24 balls.
Vegan.
Adapted from Atkokken and Christine’s Recipes.

Ingredients

  • 6 pandan leaves, chopped into small pieces; and 2 additional pandan leaves
  • 2 tbsp + 2 tsp water
  • 120g sweet potato, skins removed (use different coloured sweet potatoes if preferred; I used 60g each of Australian orange sweet potato and Vietnamese yellow sweet potato, and then divided the rest of the ingredients into two batches)
  • 4 tbsp coconut milk
  • 120g glutinous rice flour
  • 50g gula melaka, finely grated
  • Dessicated coconut, as needed

Directions

  1. Cut 6 panadan Leaves into small pieces and blend it with the water. Squeeze to get about 2 tbsp of dark green pandan juice. Divide into two portions if using two different coloured sweet potatoes.
  2. Steam sweet potato in a saucepan with a little water. Let cool down, then mash.
  3. Mix mashed sweet potato with the pandan juice and coconut milk.
  4. Add in glutinous rice flour and incorporate until the dough comes together.
  5. Portion dough out into 10-15g pieces and flatten into circles. Place about half teaspoon of grated gula melaka into the center of the circle, roll into a ball and seal. Place the ball in a shallow plate of glutinous rice flour to prevent them from sticking together.
  6. Place the remaining 2 pandan leaves into a pot of water and bring to boil a pot of water. Drop the balls into the boiling water. Cook until the Ondeh Ondeh floats to the surface of the boiling water.
  7. Remove the Ondeh Ondeh with a slotted spoon and leave it to cool for 2 mins.
  8. Roll the Ondeh Ondeh in grated coconut and serve.

 
Surprisingly, both my Mum and sister actually liked the Ondeh Ondeh despite it lacking the squirty effect. So try the recipe at your own risk.